Thingamajig Candy – Crispy Peanut Butter Goodness

Thingamajig Candy

Thingamajig Candy was an all-time favorite for many people. The bar was a crispy, peanut butter and chocolate combination. It crunched in your mouth with a sweet peanut butter flavor. Its peanut butter filling and cocoa-flavored crisps delighted many who like peanut butter candy with a bit of a crisp flavor. People thought it to be the same as Whatchamacallit (also discontinued). However, Thingamajig came with peanut butter filling inside Hershey’s mouth-watering chocolate. It was manufactured in limited quantity along with Whatchamacallit. The novelty in the funny name and uniqueness in the taste made Thingamajig popular among people.

History and Background

It was manufactured by Hershey’s (one of the most popular chocolate manufacturers in the USA). 

The Thingamajig was first introduced in 2009 as a limited edition and reappeared in 2011-2012. After that, its manufacturing was stopped and it slowly disappeared from the market. 

Notably, its wrapper itself mentioned it as a limited-time offer. Thingamajig was partly manufactured along with companion candy (Whatchamacallit). Though Thingamajig Candy didn’t gain much attraction, it had a different fan base for its taste.

Thingamajig Candy Ingredients

The bar had a deep thick layer of chocolate properly mixed with cocoa crisps, surfaced by a thin layer of peanut butter, and then this whole bar was overlaid in milk chocolate, with a slightly thick coating on top. 

Nutritional Aspects of Thingamajig

One thingamajig candy bar had 220 calories.

It had the following nutrition profile: 

  • Total Fat – 13.00g 
  • Saturated Fat – 9.00g
  • Trans Fat – 4.00g
  • Cholesterol – 0mg
  • Sodium – 135mg
  • Total Carbohydrates – 25.00g
  • Dietary Fiber – 1.00g
  • Sugar – 18.00g
  • Protein – 3.00g
  • Iron – 0.4 mg
  • Calcium – 40mg 

The calorie breakdown is 44% carbs, 51% fat, and 5% protein. 

The Mysterious Departure of Thingamajig Candy Bar

Thingamajig bar was launched in 2009 as an experiment to swell up the sale of Whatchamacallit bars, only to be eliminated in 2012. It did not have lasting success in the market. Which was very disappointing to the small group of fans that loved the candy bar.

There is no solid reason why Thingamajig was discontinued. However, one possible explanation is ascribed to low sales volume. There is a fair chance that it was not a large and significant seller in the market, had minimal fan support, which is why it was discontinued. 

People who loved these candies were distressed and tried to convince Hershey to bring the candy bar back. Some are hoping they might be able to bring it back one day.

Thingamajig Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Do They Still Make Thingamajig Candy?

No, they have not been produced since 2012.

How Many Calories Does One Thingamajig Candy Bar Have?

One thingamajig candy bar has 220 calories.

What Made Thingamajig Stand Out?

While Whatchamacallit is made of peanut rice crispy bottom, covered by a layer of caramel, dipped in chocolate, Thingamajig had peanut butter, chocolate, and cocoa crisps. It did not have caramel, unlike Whatchamacallit. It had a lovely cocoa smell that served as a relief to the olfactory bulbs.

These bars were smaller, easy to bite, and could easily slide into the small pockets of your pants or jeans. They were crispy, neither too salty nor too sweet striking a perfect balance between both taste buds.

Who Manufactured the Thingamajig Candy Bar?

Hershey’s (the largest and one of the most popular chocolate manufacturers in the USA) was the producer of Thingamajig Candy. 

Related: Bounty Candy Bar Review

Video: Comparison and Review of Whatchamacallit Candy Bar

This is a good video to see if you want to see the candy wrapper and bar up close and also a taste test.

Related: See our other reviews of discontinued candies, including: Bawls Mints and Figamajigs Chocolate Fig Bars

Finally, if you love peanut butter candy that is crunchy and popular, be sure to try: Chick-O-Stick or the Zero Candy Bar.

Image Credit: Evan-Amos, CC BY-SA 3.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

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