Robin Eggs Candy – Egg Shaped Malted Milk Goodness

Robin Eggs Candy

What are Robin Eggs Candy?

Robin Eggs candies are malted milk candies in the shape of an egg. The candy is quite famous during the Easter season. The candy is bite-size and around three-fourths of an inch in diameter. There are four colors of the candy in a single packaging. All of them have blue freckles drawn on them to resemble Easter eggs.

The Robin Eggs candy are sold in a bag or in mini milk cartons, like Whoppers, which is another candy in the Whoppers candy line of products.

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History of Robin Eggs Candy

Before the inception of Robin Eggs candy, its predecessor was called Giants, produced by the Overland Candy Company in 1939. Overland combined with Leaf Machinery, Leaf Gum, and Chicago Biscuit Company in 1947. They were collectively rebranded as the Leaf Brands.

Leaf Brands introduced Whoppers candy in 1949. Initially, they used to sell two pieces for a cent. There was no packaging, and it used to be sold loose. Somewhere between 1950 and 1952, Whoppers got its egg-shape and the name Robbin Eggs. Thus, the small egg-shaped and freckled milk candy was introduced around Easter.

Presently, the candy is marketed and produced by The Hershey Company.

What is the Flavor and Taste of Robin Eggs Candy like?

Every Robin Eggs candy is handcrafted. No two eggs look alike. It has a chocolaty core, and the candy is chewy when you pop it in your mouth. It leaves a sweet taste once you are done devouring it.

Although there are four different colors (pink, blue, yellow, and white) of the candies, they all taste the same. The different pastel colors are given to bring the Easter feels. 

Each colored candy has blue speckles on it. You are likely to get a blue tongue if you eat too many of these candies.

Ingredients of Robin Eggs Candy

The Robin Eggs candy contains Whey (milk), Dextrose, Sugar, Corn Syrup, Hydrogenated Palm Kernel Oil, Malted Milk (Barley Malt, Wheat flour, milk, salt, Sodium Bicarbonate), Cocoa, Calcium Carbonate, Salt, Carnauba Wax, natural and artificial flavors. 

It also contains 2% or less of Soy Lecithin, Tapioca Dextrin, Sorbitan Tristearate, and Artificial Colors (Red 40 Lake, Blue 1 Lake, and Yellow 5 Lake).

Nutritional Facts of Robin Eggs Candy

Below are the nutritional facts for a serving size of 24 pieces (41 g), containing 190 calories per serving.

% Daily Value
Total Fat (5 g) 8%
Saturated Fat (5 g) 25%
Trans Fat (0 g) 0%
Cholesterol (0 mg) 0%
Sodium (65 mg) 3%
Total Carbohydrate (36 g) 12%
Dietary Fiber (0 g) 0%
Total Sugars (31 g)
Protein (< 1 g)
Vitamin D (0.0 iu) 0%
Calcium (39.0 mg) 4%
Iron (0.5 mg) 2%
Potassium (90.0 mg) 3%

If you like Robin Eggs, you will probably also like the chocolate and caramel flavors of Rolo Candies.

Are Robin Eggs Candy Gluten-free?

A Robin Eggs candy contains malted milk as a major ingredient. The malted milk consists of barley and wheat extracts. It implies that the candy is not gluten-free. 

Fun Facts about Robin Eggs Candy

Let us look at some of the interesting facts surrounding Easter candy.

  • Initially, the candies were huge in shape before bringing it down to a small bite-sized shape. They were called Giants.
  • The candies are available only during Easter.
  • It takes more than four weeks to prepare a single batch of candies.
  • It takes around five months to prepare a year’s worth of Robin Eggs candies.
  • Eleven million pounds of candy is produced every year.
  • Every egg is handcrafted to give a speckled look.
  • Instead of using an egg-shaped mold, the brand uses a vacuum on a malt ball to create the shape you see.
  • Even though there are four different colors of the candy, every color turns your mouth blue due to the blue freckles embedded in every color.

If you like hard candy, also see Werther’s Original Candy. And a retro favorite – Necco Wafers!

Video – Mini Robin Eggs Package Opening and Taste Test

If you want to see what it looks like to open the package and a taste test, watch this video. It’s fun and will give you a good sense of why these mini robin eggs with malted milk flavor in a crunchy shell are so popular – especially for Easter!

Image Credit: “Robins Eggs.” by Jenny Leigh is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

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